Rabbit Recipes

These rabbit recipes feature the lean, all-white meat of the domestically raised rabbit.

Why raise and eat domestic rabbit?

  • Home-raised rabbits usually have no added hormones, no antibiotics and no known pesticides.
  • You know where your meat came from, that it lived a good life that ended humanely.
  • Eating rabbit, in balance with the rest of your diet, is extremely healthful. Meat broth is rich in immune-system-supercharging essential glyconutrients, present in all meats, including lapin (rabbit meat). Glyconutrients are contained in the factors that tend to gel the broth when chilled.
  • Rabbits are high in protein, low in moisture and very low in fat.  

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The low-fat, however, is sometimes TOO low. Eat nothing but rabbits for a few weeks, and you'll get sick with rabbit starvation.

Nearly any chicken recipe can be turned into a rabbit recipe.

Before we share our recipes, we wanted you to know that you may already have lots of chicken recipes for which you could easily substitute rabbit.

This is because a young rabbit really does taste much like chicken.  Do you have a favorite way to prepare your chicken? Try substituting a fryer rabbit for the chicken. Reserve the older, 'stewer' rabbits for crock pot recipes.

To get the best results from the substitution, consider that chickens have more moisture and more fat than do rabbits. So, rabbits usually need to be cooked longer than chicken, unless a very young fryer is used. Additionally, you'd be wise to add in some fat, for example, oil, cream or butter, depending on the recipe used. For example, our Lapin au Vin recipe below uses bacon which adds fat, and cooks the rabbit in a broth, adding moisture. (That is one genuinely tasty rabbit recipe!)

Here are our Favorite Rabbit Recipes

Lapin au Vin – a rabbit recipe

Basic Crock Pot Rabbit Recipe

This rabbit recipe is about as simple as it gets. Just put a whole rabbit into the crock pot. Add 1/2 cup filtered water, salt and pepper to taste, and several minced garlic cloves. Cook several hours until tender. Pull the lapin (rabbit meat) from the bones and refrigerate till you're ready to use.

In the crock pot, add water to the broth until it covers the rabbit bones, and keep cooking on low overnight. Discard the bones and save the broth for your next batch of chicken or rabbit soup.

Lapin au Vin

Our very favorite rabbit recipe. Savory rabbit fried in bacon drippings, and then simmered in a piquant wine sauce (pictured above).

OMG, mouth is watering...!

Rabbit Dumplings

You'll find a wonderful Rabbit dumplings recipe at the end of this excellent article: "Raising and Eating Rabbits in the Big City." Clicking on the link will open a new window so you can get the Rabbit Dumplings recipe, and then return to this page.

(See more about this article at Rabbit Farming. It illustrates our vision of people helping each other through planting and raising their own food locally, and through inter-dependence enhancing self-sufficiency.)

Stuffed Rabbit Recipe

This is simply a twist on an old favorite – stuffed turkey, but of course on a much smaller scale.

Rabbit Liver and Onions Recipe

Rabbit Liver and Onions Recipe

One taste of these liver and onions, and you'll never loathe liver again (pictured at right).


Hasenpfeffer is German for "peppered rabbit." Apparently the Germans liked to use lots of pepper to mask the gamey taste in wild-caught rabbits. 

This hasenpfeffer recipe calls for marinading the meat for a long time. This is particularly suited for 'athletic' and strong-tasting wild-caught cottontails, hares, European rabbits, or even domestic stewer rabbits, because it helps to soften the meat and minimize the gaminess. (Link coming soon.)


Rabbit Stew Recipe

After Thanksgiving, we always toss all the turkey bones and scraps into a large dutch oven and boil them for hours in order to make turkey soup. 

Well, we do the same thing with our rabbit scraps and bones.  The original intent was to make a rabbit broth, however, we always seem to end up with a rich and hearty rabbit stew.

The Circle of Life

Author Ms. Lierre Keith quit eating a vegan diet after 20 years due to both failing health and increasing evidence that the extensive agriculture and irrigation required to plant grains would eventually destroy the earth. In her book, The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability (left), she very ably presents sharp evidence that vegetarianism in order to "save the planet" is nothing but myth. 

Ms. Keith directs us to observe life in motion:

Find a small wild spot somewhere, the edge of a parking lot, the tree outside your window, and watch. Really watch. This is what you will see: everything is eating and then being eaten, and through it all life endures. There is no hierarchy, only hunger. And it's through our hunger that we participate in the cosmos, in an endless cycle of life, death, and regeneration" (The Vegetarian Myth: Food, Justice, and Sustainability, pg 72).

Eating and being eaten is part of the circle of life (see Symbiotic Relationships) for every species, from mammals, trees, veggies, and grains, even to the microbes and nutrients in the soil.

Home-Grown Raw Rabbit Recipe for Feeding Cats and Dogs

Homemade Pet Food: Carnivores, including dogs and cats, have digestive systems designed to handle raw meat, including raw bones and organs such as liver and heart.

Recipes for Wild Rabbits and other Game

Like to Hunt?
We think you might like this cookbook by "quarterback killer" Jared Allen, defensive end for the Minnesota Vikings. When he's not playing football, Jared likes to hunt, but he says, "I'm not a trophy hunter." He learned by age 6 that if you kill it, you should eat it.

We don't advocate pet rabbit meat for dinner for fairly obvious reasons - you may break the heart of a child!

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