Odd Doe

by Kathleen
(USA )

Hello, I've got two dutch rabbits. They were originally bought for breeding, and were old enough to breed. We waited & waited, never saw them breed, never would breed.


We figured that they were both girls, until one evening I was going to check up on them, and there in their cage lay a little bunny. The doe never did anything, no hair pulling or nest building. We never knew she was pregnant.

It's been a year or two since then, and they've bred. And the doe knew seemed to get pregnant.

But a few days ago (I don't know exactly when) I put them in a smaller cage to clean their cage, and the boy bunny hopped onto my doe and then after grunting & falling off, the girl bunny jumped on him! I was surprised but I let them continue.

After I was finished with the cage, I picked up my doe and placed her in the cage. I saw that under her tail a clear jelly-like substance was on her. I assumed that it was semen.

She's been skittish ever since, and the boy's still with her, and they've not been mating ever since. But I'm wondering if it's normal for the girl to get on the boy? And how long should I leave my buck in with her?

Thanks For Any Information.

***** Karen Sez *****
Very interesting account! It is unusual in that most male and female rabbit pairs will crank out babies incessantly, until the doe is frankly pooped out. Apparently the personalities and the relational dynamics of this pair play out slightly differently, lol.

Yes, sounds like the buck and the doe definitely bred. The fact that the doe humped the buck is not uncommon. It is evidence of her acute readiness. She was asserting her dominance and begging for more breeding.

That jelly-like substance was indeed ejaculate, but I would not have wanted to see it outside the doe. If the doe pees within a half-hour of mating, it can wash the sperm out of the doe. On the other hand, with multiple breedings, the chances are good that there is still plenty of sperm and ejaculate inside the doe. I'd gamble on a litter in 31 days.

(FYI: when we check the doe's hind end for a successful breeding, we are satisfied to find shiny slippery-appearing moisture at her vent.)

The doe's skittishness is a very good early indication of the hormonal changes of pregnancy.

Even though the two are no longer mating, it might be a good idea to remove the buck to a separate cage now.

Mark your calendar - nest in on day 28, and expect the babies on the evening of day 31.

Good luck and have fun!


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