Genetics in the Nest Box after a Big Mistake!

by Bunny Lady

The color of the pink baby a few days later

I made a first-timer mistake (I have been raising rabbits for 20 yrs).

I had all my bunnies ready for culling. I raise mine out a little longer because I have Champagne D'Argents and I want that perfect hide too.

Any ways I would have bet my pay check on all the bunnies being does as I check them more than once. (See where this is going?!)

Well, culling day came, and surprise - 4 dead babies :(

So I took care of the buck and a week later the doe that kitted.

Well yesterday here comes another litter (palpitated this last doe and knew this litter was coming). All 6 kits are as healthy as can be.

My head is spinning when I see them. Mom and dad are full brother and sister so pure Champagne's.

Well, I got 2 PINK babies? and I'm wondering why. Champagnes are always born black. Maybe Creme d'Argent? Albino?

***** Karen Sez *****

Yep, rookie mistake, LOL

As they say, breeding brother and sister (or close relatives) can be a quick way to discover what recessive genes are hiding behind the dominant ones. Your guesses are spot on, but time will tell which is correct.

If those kits are albino, then you've discovered the albino recessive 'c' gene at the 'C' locus in BOTH the sire and the dam. If so, then each of the parent rabbits is 'Cc' at the C locus. Mate the two, and roughly 25% of the offspring will be snow-white ('cc') with red eyes.

If Cremes, then you've found a couple of 'e' non-extension genes. If so, then each rabbit parent is 'Ee' at the E locus, and mating the animals results in roughly 25% of the offspring with 'ee,' or red coloration instead of black. Add in the silvering gene, and you end up with Creme d'Argents.

Don't keep us in suspense! Let us know if they end up white or red. :-))

My money is guessing red. After squinting cross-eyed at your pictures (which I'm glad you posted, thanks!), I thought I detected a bit of beginning red.

I do have a bit of practice at nest-box-squinting, since my red kits always seem to fool me. I think I have an albino, and in 3 days, it turns red behind my back. You learn to squint a little harder next time! :-)

If you REALLY don't want a red or white gene (whichever it turns out to be), then you'll have to do some test-breedings and identify the rabbits carrying the recessive trait so you can avoid using them in the breeding program.

After 20 years you no doubt know all that, but for those reading this page that don't, here is more on rabbit genetics:

P.S.: Have you read about MY rookie mistake? It's not the same as yours, but still somewhat embarrassing, er, funny:

Bunny Lady updated her post a few days later
, giving us a photo of the pink baby as the fur began to grow in. She said:

"Here is the color of the pink baby today. Kind of a silver, gray color. :) Hope it lives and I get to see the end result."

Wow! So, not albino and not Creme d'Argent. Yep, certainly does look lilac, though hard to tell exactly on a computer screen. I would think the likelihood is better that this is a dilute black (blue) rabbit, or an Argente Bleu as they are known where they are raised and recognized, but...yeah, looks Lilac!

Thanks so much for the update! I think silvered Blues or Lilacs would be absolutely beautiful. :-)

Comments for Genetics in the Nest Box after a Big Mistake!

Average Rating starstarstarstarstar

Click here to add your own comments

Apr 16, 2015
Just an update
by: Bunny Lady

I have unfortunately lost 2 of the babies. One of the pink ones yesterday and a black one this morning. Also I have had to start hand feeding them :( I hate having to do it but the doe stopped feeding them. Now The remaining pink baby is kind of a silver color :) Lilac? WOW just more questions than answers lol I will post a new pic today

Apr 14, 2015
A lil more info :)
by: Bunny Lady

The grand parents of the babies have been bred together A LOT like 7 litters in 2 years. Nothing but black babies. I'm so excited to see what happens with this litter and I will keep you posted as to their true color.

Click here to add your own comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Comments.

Protected by Copyscape Plagiarism Check Software